embraceyourfreak said: Do you have any pictures of dogs running so fast they look like they're hover-crafts? Love your blog by the way, totally brightens my day!

doublepistolsandawonk:

thecutestofthecute:

ACTIVATING LAUNCH SEQUENCE IN 3.. 2..1

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jesus lord

Hell no! Perhaps the greatest gifs ever!

15 September 2014 ·

If you’re ever worried that you fucked up real bad, just remember that there are over 2,500 reported cases of vacuum cleaner-induced genital trauma in the United States each year. 

If it says “vacuum cleaner-induced genital trauma” it’s got to be good.

(Source: blue-collar-girl, via terilynns)

15 September 2014 ·

horrorpandas:

The Blob (1958)

Everybody sing:

"Beware of the blob, it creeps
And leaps and glides and slides
Across the floor
Right through the door
And all around the wall
A splotch, a blotch
Be careful of the blob — *POP*”

Lyrics by Burt Bacharach.

(Source: horrorpandas, via swampthingy)

15 September 2014 ·

csc 3
scottpatrick:

“The Beatles recorded using four tracks. (…) Still, four tracks hardly sufficed for their increasingly complex arrangements. As the tape’s four tracks filled up and were mixed down to one to make room for more music, these pre-mixes were produced with mono in mind so that when all of the tracks were folded together, they would fit together like a stack of cards. That’s why the mono set sounds so coherent and why arguably you can actually hear more detail in mono.“

I agree. Some people think if you get the mono versions you only get mono versions. The versions that were brought over to the US were “stereoized”. They simply don’t sound as good, especially on a good set of headphones.

scottpatrick:

“The Beatles recorded using four tracks. (…) Still, four tracks hardly sufficed for their increasingly complex arrangements. As the tape’s four tracks filled up and were mixed down to one to make room for more music, these pre-mixes were produced with mono in mind so that when all of the tracks were folded together, they would fit together like a stack of cards. That’s why the mono set sounds so coherent and why arguably you can actually hear more detail in mono.“

I agree. Some people think if you get the mono versions you only get mono versions. The versions that were brought over to the US were “stereoized”. They simply don’t sound as good, especially on a good set of headphones.

15 September 2014 ·

1

I just zeroed out my iCloud inbox. Whew, took me a couple of hours, but I straightened things out. There were over 1,000 unread messages in there. Hope I can keep it tidy.

15 September 2014 ·

Power failure.

14 September 2014 ·

csc 6
holybatblog:

Batcycle

You got me with this one.

holybatblog:

Batcycle

You got me with this one.

14 September 2014 ·

seanhowe:

Variety review of Marvel Super-Heroes animated series, October 26, 1966.

This review is by a person who didn’t have children in the 1960’s. We just wanted the cartoons. We didn’t care (or know) how they were constructed. Back in the day, I’d watch Space Angel and Clutch Cargo, which had the all too creepy “SyncroVox” (the real mouths of the voice actors filmed and superimposed on the characters faces).
The only reason a lot of people from my time don’t know about The Marvel Super-Heroes show was that it was mostly syndicated in larger markets, like New York and Los Angeles. Back then, cable TV was used as a way to get broadcast TV out to the last mile, where reception was non-existent. We were fortunate enough to have service where I lived as a child at the time (Santa Maria, CA, about 200 miles north of L.A.) so in addition to our local ABC, NBC and CBS affiliates (channels 3, 6 and 12 respectively), we also got KTLA 5, KABC 7, KHJ 9, KTTV 11, and KCOP 13. They showed Marvel Super-Heroes on KHJ at 4 in the afternoon. They conflicted with showings of the live action Superman with George Reeves on channel 6, but, these were cartoons. So, I have seen them all and really liked them as a kid.
I have since seen some of the restored ones. For the most part they don’t hold up, not because of the limited animation, but because the stories are truncated in such a way that they fail to make sense. This was the mid-sixties and Marvel had already committed to building a cohesive universe, which meant cross title team-ups. They did have The Avengers in a series of Thor’s cartoon block (and it’s on YouTube) but it’s really a Thor story with The Avengers appearance as icing on the cupcake.
Anyway, even though these weren’t seen everywhere, they were popular enough to have ABC buy Grantray-Lawrence’s Spider-Man show and have Hanna-Barbera do the Fantastic Four. Spider-Man at least had John Romita as a consultant, FF had Alex Toth as chief designer and storyboard artist. It looked enough like Kirby and was the most well written of the three, IMHO.
The Marvel Super-Heroes did give us one benefit; The Merry Marvel Marching Society, of which I was proud member.

seanhowe:

Variety review of Marvel Super-Heroes animated series, October 26, 1966.

This review is by a person who didn’t have children in the 1960’s. We just wanted the cartoons. We didn’t care (or know) how they were constructed. Back in the day, I’d watch Space Angel and Clutch Cargo, which had the all too creepy “SyncroVox” (the real mouths of the voice actors filmed and superimposed on the characters faces).

The only reason a lot of people from my time don’t know about The Marvel Super-Heroes show was that it was mostly syndicated in larger markets, like New York and Los Angeles. Back then, cable TV was used as a way to get broadcast TV out to the last mile, where reception was non-existent. We were fortunate enough to have service where I lived as a child at the time (Santa Maria, CA, about 200 miles north of L.A.) so in addition to our local ABC, NBC and CBS affiliates (channels 3, 6 and 12 respectively), we also got KTLA 5, KABC 7, KHJ 9, KTTV 11, and KCOP 13. They showed Marvel Super-Heroes on KHJ at 4 in the afternoon. They conflicted with showings of the live action Superman with George Reeves on channel 6, but, these were cartoons. So, I have seen them all and really liked them as a kid.

I have since seen some of the restored ones. For the most part they don’t hold up, not because of the limited animation, but because the stories are truncated in such a way that they fail to make sense. This was the mid-sixties and Marvel had already committed to building a cohesive universe, which meant cross title team-ups. They did have The Avengers in a series of Thor’s cartoon block (and it’s on YouTube) but it’s really a Thor story with The Avengers appearance as icing on the cupcake.

Anyway, even though these weren’t seen everywhere, they were popular enough to have ABC buy Grantray-Lawrence’s Spider-Man show and have Hanna-Barbera do the Fantastic Four. Spider-Man at least had John Romita as a consultant, FF had Alex Toth as chief designer and storyboard artist. It looked enough like Kirby and was the most well written of the three, IMHO.

The Marvel Super-Heroes did give us one benefit; The Merry Marvel Marching Society, of which I was proud member.

(via themarvelageofcomics)

14 September 2014 ·

The Strand Magazine rejected my latest submission

wordishness:

It had been some time since I last stepped through the door to my old lodgings at Baker Street. After greeting Mrs. Hudson and declining her tempting offer of a late supper, I mounted the staircase which led to the study of my most singular companion. As I entered the sitting-room, however, the…

Love. This. Sherlock Homies?

14 September 2014 ·

johnbyrnedraws:

Space:1999 #5 cover by John Byrne. 1976.

This comic was better than the TV show…

14 September 2014 ·

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