browsethestacks:

Vampires by bennyd302

browsethestacks:

Vampires by bennyd302

20 August 2014 ·

fastcompany:

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Wow people on the first impression with tricks as simple as including your middle initial in your signature, or throwing on a pair of glasses.

For more ways to look like a smarty-pants without cracking a book, check out the video above.

I like number 6.

(Source: Fast Company)

20 August 2014 ·

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There’s gonna be a Lauren Bacall tribute on TCM. I’m sad she’s gone, and this is how I remember her. “To Have and Have Not” was my first Bogart, Bacall and Howard Hawks movie. I loved the way Hawks treated the heroines in his movies. They were direct and weren’t scared to be sexual. Not sexy (they were that too) but sexual. There’s a difference. Lauren Bacall was the template.

14 August 2014 ·

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12 August 2014 ·

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I just heard that Robin Williams passed away. This is how I remember him, on stage and riffing. Stuff was written but you knew it could go anywhere. We knew he was brilliant and would do great things. 

I just heard that Robin Williams passed away. This is how I remember him, on stage and riffing. Stuff was written but you knew it could go anywhere. We knew he was brilliant and would do great things. 

11 August 2014 ·

Protect and Survive - In Order - YouTube

Protect and Survive was produced in 1980 by the British Home Office as a booklet, radio spots and this series of short films. It laid out what to do in order to Protect yourself before a nuclear attack and Survive afterwards. What the Home Office didn’t tell anyone, is that the UK had become the forward line of defense for the USA, so we wouldn’t have to fight the Soviet Union on our soil.

The Home Office was concerned with local uprisings so the most veiled film in the series is number 4, Stay At Home. It suggests that the best place for you is cooped up in your “fall-out room’s inner refuge” and that if you move, your home could be commandeered by the local government for housing displaced people; if you move to another city, you can expect no help from the local authorities.

At the time, if you lived in the south of England, you were screwed:

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This was, as they say, a target rich environment. If the UK or American early warning system had a high confidence of an all out attack, the lead time was eight minutes. The personnel in those early warning centers were directed to wait and ride it out. So, if you lived in the south of England, hopefully you would be vaporized in the first few milliseconds in the initial fireball.

Here’s another map*:

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This is the effect of a 1 megaton Soviet SS-20 Sabre “theater based” ballistic missile (meaning that it wasn’t an ICBM) detonating in an airburst 300 meters above ground zero (Nelson’s Column in Trafalgar Square). Back in 1980, the USSR had the SS-20 Mod-1, 2 and 3. Mod-1 carried a single 1 megaton warhead, Mod-2 had three 0.15 Mt warheads (MIRV; Multiple Independent Re-entry Vehicles) and there is no estimate for the Mod-3. I’m using the SS-20 Mod-1 with a single warhead.**

Here is the fall-out profile map:

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The fall-out drifts all the way out to the North Sea. The more bombing, the more fall-out.

Here are the results and what the circles indicate on the map:

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As you can see, over 600,000 dead and well over 1.2 million injured. What gets me is that if you are within 10 km from the fireball, thermal effects from the blast would probably give you third degree burns. That’s just one bomb.

This is why I think Protect and Survive is laughable. They assume several things:

  1. You would have adequate warning leading up to a nuclear strike.
  2. The warning time was enough to prepare your makeshift fall-out shelter to wait out the supposed 2 weeks for the fall-out to dissipate.
  3. That your radio would work or that stations like the BBC would be viable at all.
  4. That the local infrastructure would be intact enough to stop raiding and looting.
  5. That fall-out wouldn’t have long term effects on the soil, water supply, and farm animals.
  6. That technology would work again after the effects of electromagnetic pulse.

The whole thing is a joke.

I added QED: A Guide to Armageddon and Threads to the playlist. The QED show is a half hour BBC documentary on the effects of nuclear blast and a kind of anti Protect and Survive. Threads is a gripping film about how one family deals with the destruction of Sheffield and the aftermath of nuclear war. Parts of it play like a doc, parts of it like SF/horror. Both of these were directed by Mick Jackson during the height of nuclear war hysteria in Europe in the early 1980’s.

I think it plays better than Nicolas Meyer’s The Day After (which I’ve added to the playlist as well, because you have the right to check it for yourself), in my opinion. In hindsight, we in the USA weren’t as close to what was going on as the folks in England and Europe. Threads hits the viewer like a hammer, especially near the end where it becomes apparent that the human race is not going to make it.

Footnotes:

* Nukemap
http://nuclearsecrecy.com/nukemap/

** Information derived from fas.org:
http://fas.org/nuke/guide/russia/theater/rt-21m.htm

10 August 2014 ·

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iPad + Bluetooth keyboard = productivity.

iPad + Bluetooth keyboard = productivity.

10 August 2014 ·

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scottpatrick:

took a football in the face.

OWWHH MY NOSE!

scottpatrick:

took a football in the face.

OWWHH MY NOSE!

9 August 2014 ·

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Massive Dynamic: What Don’t We Do?

You will need Flash…

9 August 2014 ·

comicbookcovers:

What If? #11, October 1978, cover by Jack Kirby and Joe Sinnott

I really liked this.

comicbookcovers:

What If? #11, October 1978, cover by Jack Kirby and Joe Sinnott

I really liked this.

(via themarvelageofcomics)

9 August 2014 ·

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